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> Fuel Tank Pads:, Product Recommendations
914 7T3
post Aug 5 2018, 02:26 PM
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Looking for a replacement solution to the original fuel tank pads that retain moisture and rust the tank from the outside in.

Was thinking about some type of rubber padding that may be used similar to the below. Would also like to line the top of the battery tray with it as well.

Any thoughts?

Waxman 2-Pack 4-in Black Rubber Pads (w/ adhesive backing)

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mepstein
post Aug 5 2018, 03:00 PM
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I’m using self adhesive rubber. So much better than the pieces of carpet that was used originally.
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raynekat
post Aug 8 2018, 05:29 PM
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There's no way water should be getting on those pads. I just finished a big restoration and just put new felt pads in there.

Got some leftover felt if you need some..... (IMG:style_emoticons/default/wink.gif)
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Rand
post Aug 8 2018, 05:36 PM
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mouse pads? (IMG:style_emoticons/default/tongue.gif)
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Dave_Darling
post Aug 8 2018, 05:53 PM
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It may be that water should never get on those--but it does.

I used some neoprene rubber that I bought at the hardware store. Glued it into place like the stock felt pads. Had to use two layers to get a decent thickness.

--DD
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Rand
post Aug 8 2018, 05:55 PM
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mouse pads (IMG:style_emoticons/default/laugh.gif) (cheap neoprine cut into nicely proportioned squares)
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bbrock
post Aug 8 2018, 06:28 PM
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You guys aren't worried about the neoprene wicking moisture through capillary action between the tank and neoprene and trapping it? I think the ideal pad would be non-absorbent, but ventilated like a spun nylon or something like that.
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URY914
post Aug 8 2018, 06:44 PM
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The original felt pads got wet and the tank had pin holes in it. Don't use felt.
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Larmo63
post Aug 8 2018, 07:54 PM
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I used old wetsuit material (neoprene) when my tank went back in.....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RdNEEzlR4pk
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bbrock
post Aug 8 2018, 08:27 PM
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I think I might go for something more like this https://www.mcmaster.com/#polyester-felt/=1e2olep. Or find some spun polyester filter material that will provide the cushion while letting the space breath. While neoprene is non absorbent, I think it would still trap moisture against the tank surface.
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mepstein
post Aug 8 2018, 08:35 PM
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https://www.grainger.com/product/E-JAMES-EP...;searchBar=true

lots to choose from


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ClayPerrine
post Aug 9 2018, 09:28 AM
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Please don't use the felt again. Over the winter, we started smelling gas in Betty's car. I chased it for over a month, replacing all the fuel lines, new Tangerine fuel line kit, etc. While pulling the tank for the umpteenth time to check the lines and pump underneath, Betty noticed the felt pad was dripping. I was going to blow it off because it was raining outside at the time. She touched the felt pad stuck to the bottom of the tank, and found out it was gas. That explains why we couldn't smell gas until we filled the tank. When we put in under 5 gallons, it didn't leak, and didn't smell. (IMG:style_emoticons/default/headbang.gif)



I had to replace the fuel tank to fix it. I used rubber sheet to pad the tank when reinstalling.



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914 7T3
post Aug 9 2018, 11:14 AM
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QUOTE(Larmo63 @ Aug 8 2018, 06:54 PM) *

I used old wetsuit material (neoprene) when my tank went back in.....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RdNEEzlR4pk



This is why Larmo is so well loved within the 914 community!

(IMG:style_emoticons/default/beerchug.gif)
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914 7T3
post Aug 9 2018, 11:18 AM
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So what is the consensus as to which material is more suitable, neoprene or polyester felt and what would be the recommended thickness?
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Rand
post Aug 9 2018, 12:37 PM
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QUOTE(914 7T3 @ Aug 9 2018, 09:18 AM) *

So what is the consensus as to which material is more suitable, neoprene or polyester felt and what would be the recommended thickness?

It's pretty clear that felt is out and neoprene wins. Old wet suits are perfect if you can find them. Free often. Mouse pads are dirt cheap, and some may need the fabric ripped away if it could trap moisture or at least put back to back so only the neoprene touches anything. Thickness isn't super critical, think similar to original but with better material.
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bbrock
post Aug 9 2018, 12:53 PM
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I know i'm speaking alone here but I have serious doubts that a neoprene pad is solving the problem of moisture being trapped against the tank surface. It is just trapping the moisture it in a different way. If the surface of neoprene or rubber is textured to minimize the contact area with the tank, I think that would be ideal. Another option might be to smear the pads with a sealant just before dropping the tank in to prevent water wicking between the surfaces. It would be easy enough to test a neoprene pad by placing a piece of glass with a little weight on top and then spraying water on the edge so you could see how much wicks under the glass and how long it takes to dry.
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raynekat
post Aug 9 2018, 01:08 PM
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QUOTE(bbrock @ Aug 9 2018, 11:53 AM) *

I know i'm speaking alone here but I have serious doubts that a neoprene pad is solving the problem of moisture being trapped against the tank surface. It is just trapping the moisture it in a different way. If the surface of neoprene or rubber is textured to minimize the contact area with the tank, I think that would be ideal. Another option might be to smear the pads with a sealant just before dropping the tank in to prevent water wicking between the surfaces. It would be easy enough to test a neoprene pad by placing a piece of glass with a little weight on top and then spraying water on the edge so you could see how much wicks under the glass and how long it takes to dry.



I agree completely.

If your felt pad, or whatever pad, is getting wet....you've got bigger issues.
As long as your trunk seals are in good shape, why would you be getting water in and around where the felt pads lie?
That part of your front trunk should be "bone" dry.
If not.... (IMG:style_emoticons/default/dry.gif)
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Larmo63
post Aug 9 2018, 01:45 PM
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A) My trunk doesn't leak
B) My car is garaged
C) I don't drive my car in the rain
D) It doesn't rain in California anymore, anyway
E) I have plenty on old wetsuits, we live at the beach
F) I don't ever wash my car with water
G) My car is a driver
H) I don't really care
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76-914
post Aug 9 2018, 01:55 PM
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QUOTE(raynekat @ Aug 9 2018, 12:08 PM) *

QUOTE(bbrock @ Aug 9 2018, 11:53 AM) *

I know i'm speaking alone here but I have serious doubts that a neoprene pad is solving the problem of moisture being trapped against the tank surface. It is just trapping the moisture it in a different way. If the surface of neoprene or rubber is textured to minimize the contact area with the tank, I think that would be ideal. Another option might be to smear the pads with a sealant just before dropping the tank in to prevent water wicking between the surfaces. It would be easy enough to test a neoprene pad by placing a piece of glass with a little weight on top and then spraying water on the edge so you could see how much wicks under the glass and how long it takes to dry.



I agree completely.

If your felt pad, or whatever pad, is getting wet....you've got bigger issues.
As long as your trunk seals are in good shape, why would you be getting water in and around where the felt pads lie?
That part of your front trunk should be "bone" dry.
If not.... (IMG:style_emoticons/default/dry.gif)

(IMG:style_emoticons/default/agree.gif) Me three. I’ve never had one of those pads get wet either. Even when driving in the rain at hiway speeds. This is in an air cooled and water cooled with large front cutout. If anything I’d use a Scotchbrite Pad for a replacement. Maybe even cardboard. Any material that will breath. (IMG:style_emoticons/default/beerchug.gif)
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bbrock
post Aug 9 2018, 02:00 PM
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QUOTE(raynekat @ Aug 9 2018, 01:08 PM) *

QUOTE(bbrock @ Aug 9 2018, 11:53 AM) *

I know i'm speaking alone here but I have serious doubts that a neoprene pad is solving the problem of moisture being trapped against the tank surface. It is just trapping the moisture it in a different way. If the surface of neoprene or rubber is textured to minimize the contact area with the tank, I think that would be ideal. Another option might be to smear the pads with a sealant just before dropping the tank in to prevent water wicking between the surfaces. It would be easy enough to test a neoprene pad by placing a piece of glass with a little weight on top and then spraying water on the edge so you could see how much wicks under the glass and how long it takes to dry.



I agree completely.

If your felt pad, or whatever pad, is getting wet....you've got bigger issues.
As long as your trunk seals are in good shape, why would you be getting water in and around where the felt pads lie?
That part of your front trunk should be "bone" dry.
If not.... (IMG:style_emoticons/default/dry.gif)


I guess I'm going with the assumption that it will get wet, but does seem like the pads on a car with good seals should stay dry. It occurred to me though that condensation on a metal tank full of liquid could be an issue and where neoprene would be a big improvement over standard felt since the neoprene would insulate the tank at those spots whereas the felt would just soak it up and hold it. Regardless, I still think the best pad would be a non absorbent cushion that is well ventilated.
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