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Dion
Well I've started the process of preparing for
my 2056 GT to 2.4L six "rallye tribute" auto.
Tearing into the interior I discovered some rust mites have been eating for a while.
Doesn't look too extensive but will be probing some more. The exterior left long was
patched a long time ago, albeit incorrectly. This was done by shop
that wasn't fully up to speed on these cars and I was still a novice, well
still am. I'll be doing some exploratory surgery on this left side inside and out. So I'll get this addressed before any engine install takes place. Would like to
have it buttoned up for Hershey 2017. Wish me luck.
"
Dion
E brake area top:
Exterior long near door sill bottom pic
mepstein
Doesn't look bad. Grab a multi tool and get rid of the floor tar once and for all.
914dave
QUOTE(mepstein @ Sep 9 2016, 01:16 PM) *

Doesn't look bad. Grab a multi tool and get rid of the floor tar once and for all.


I was going to suggest , contact cement heavy duty aluminum foil in place and new carpets. Good as new. Wasn't sure how that would be received. shades.gif
Dion
I intend to Mark.
As always Dave has my back!
I rely on his Jedi knowledge.
rgalla9146
QUOTE(914dave @ Sep 9 2016, 01:47 PM) *

QUOTE(mepstein @ Sep 9 2016, 01:16 PM) *

Doesn't look bad. Grab a multi tool and get rid of the floor tar once and for all.


I was going to suggest , contact cement heavy duty aluminum foil in place and new carpets. Good as new. Wasn't sure how that would be received. shades.gif


License plate ( aluminum kind , easy to bend, more 'professional') and bondo.
1/2 hour max. Finish with duct tape to prevent further rust.
mepstein
QUOTE(rgalla9146 @ Sep 9 2016, 02:25 PM) *

QUOTE(914dave @ Sep 9 2016, 01:47 PM) *

QUOTE(mepstein @ Sep 9 2016, 01:16 PM) *

Doesn't look bad. Grab a multi tool and get rid of the floor tar once and for all.


I was going to suggest , contact cement heavy duty aluminum foil in place and new carpets. Good as new. Wasn't sure how that would be received. shades.gif


License plate ( aluminum kind , easy to bend, more 'professional') and bondo.
1/2 hour max. Finish with duct tape to prevent further rust.

It's a VW. The proper method is to steal some street signs and fiberglass them in. Construction adhesive would also work.
Dion
At what point do I go to Earl Schreib & Zeibart?
After the foil is in?
914dave
Right after the foil. If you want it proper.
mepstein
All you need to do a pro repair- no metal work!
Dion
I knew this club would payoff in its wealth of knowledge. dry.gif
Thanks boys!
Stay tuned.... welder.gif
flippa
QUOTE(mepstein @ Sep 9 2016, 11:32 AM) *


It's a VW. The proper method is to steal some street signs and fiberglass them in. Construction adhesive would also work.


What, no pop rivets? huh.gif
bretth
QUOTE(flippa @ Sep 9 2016, 06:22 PM) *

What, no pop rivets? huh.gif


Yeah one pop rivet over a 4 inch hole in the frame is all it took to hold my car together.

Brett
wndsnd
QUOTE(flippa @ Sep 9 2016, 06:22 PM) *

QUOTE(mepstein @ Sep 9 2016, 11:32 AM) *


It's a VW. The proper method is to steal some street signs and fiberglass them in. Construction adhesive would also work.


What, no pop rivets? huh.gif



Leave it to an engineer to overcomplicate this repair!
Dion
You guys are great. This is gonna be fun. beer3.gif
jmitro
looks like you got a little work to do. Good luck with it!
rgalla9146

Paint it Red.
Very important.
cary
The problem your going to run into is the degradation of the inner stiffening layer too. Which is the layer where the seat belt anchor starts it spot welds. sad.gif

Jeff did an extensive rebuild/patch in that area in his thread.
http://www.914world.com/bbs2/index.php?sho...791&hl=dead

Hopefully yours won't be that extensive. Was the jack point replaced on the prior repair ?
Dion
Hey Cary,
The jack point was completely cut out. They just welded up "patch".
However unbeknownst to me they never joined the top of the patch to where it meets
the door sill area. I will cutting out that whole area to see what's what.
Yeah it will be a nice challenge with that seat belt anchor area. We'll get it done.
Also need to address front of long next to front left wheel well/fender.
Purchasing cut off wheels and a new grinder/ die grinder. I'll add to this thread as I make progress
Thanks guys.
Dion
Ok, tar all scraped out. Door braces in place.
Time this week to start cutting and removing the
offending rust areas on the longs.
Dion
Well did more exploratory surgery and it's ugly. Beauty on
the left side was in fact only skin deep. Consulted with my
bro Dave ( 914Dave ). So time to cut out the outer long complete.
To the kickup and replace the metal accordingly. Inside the cabin
area can be fixed with a few patches. Floor is in good shape remarkably.
I should just enter the buildoff at this point biggrin.gif
Stay tuned...
Dion
Ugly
Dion
blink.gif
Dion
dry.gif
Dion
Opened up whole of left longitudinal today. I'll be ordering some metal
for the U-boat. I'll be replacing the sill,door jamb, rocker outer cover,
the rear jack donut and inner rear lower firewall.
Dave lent me his spot weld remover bits so that's where I'll begin.
Then I'll address a "hatch" for the six to adjust the timing. Lots of work ahead.
Many of you guys have been here before. Wish me luck.
This will be going at the same time as reassembling Dave's GT. So little time!
altitude411
Your going to need a few more license plates and possibly another roll of duct tape... popcorn[1].gif

*subscribed*
Dion
QUOTE(altitude411 @ Oct 6 2016, 09:48 AM) *

Your going to need a few more license plates and possibly another roll of duct tape... popcorn[1].gif

*subscribed*


Hahahah. Yeah pretty much!
What has the collective done with regards to the door jamb
sticker? Is it salvageable? Do you even bother.
Being it's an "Antique" here in PA, the car doesn't get inspected.
Just wondering what you have done.
Thanks
Dion
So the build challenge is on. Happy to say I've obtained a nice heater tube from
Rich (rdauerhauer). So that's a relief as the original was a little cut into.
My supply of spotweld cutters is here, so hope to post more pics soon of progress.
Goal for this time frame till January is to remove rear quarter panel and lower firewall
driver side. As well as weld up the many numerous holes in the firewall that were used for running wires. Parts have been ordered from Restoration Design as well as 914rubber. Carry on.
mepstein
QUOTE(Dion @ Oct 6 2016, 02:25 PM) *

QUOTE(altitude411 @ Oct 6 2016, 09:48 AM) *

Your going to need a few more license plates and possibly another roll of duct tape... popcorn[1].gif

*subscribed*


Hahahah. Yeah pretty much!
What has the collective done with regards to the door jamb
sticker? Is it salvageable? Do you even bother.
Being it's an "Antique" here in PA, the car doesn't get inspected.
Just wondering what you have done.
Thanks

Take a picture of it for your records and then order a new one from Andy ( I forget his screen name on this site but someone will chime in)

I guess the lift purchase is paying off.
Dion
Mark, I don't think I'd go this deep into "hell" if it wasn't for this lift. Heheheh
I'll keep checking on the sticker. For some reason "car-bone" comes to mind regarding
odd,one off stickers and such. Thanks.
Larmo63
SoCalAndy makes the stickers.....

altitude411
Socalandy. His awesome six build is in the restoration forum
Dion
Thanks for the info on the stickers. I'll give him a shout. Yes I have his build bookmarked. It's excellent.
mbseto
I would say you have your work cut out for you. But really, your work is cutting everything out. :-)
Dion
Still cutting away. Parts from Restoration Design on the way. Time to break out
the kerosene heater soon. Hitting 38*F tonite.
Drilling out spotwelds is certainly a test of wills. Progress is
slow but it's progress.
JmuRiz
After knowing and talking with ScottyB enough, he says that even the nice looking ones have rust...looks like you got lucky and hit the motherload icon8.gif
I guess it's good restoration design is a sponsor. Best of luck on the fixn', your progress thus far shows you are going to be able to handle it just fine.
theleschyouknow
keep up the good work

somebody I think in the 2016 build off had an alternate method of drilling out the spot welds using regular bits
sorry can't remember who it was or the details like bit sizes but basically it involved drilling just thru the first layer with a larger bit and 'exposing' the weld then drilling a thru hole large enough to remove most if not all of the weld then, if necessary, he reported it was easy to pry/pop the panels apart
kinda sounds like 2 steps to do 1 to me but he seemed to like the results

looks like you have your hands full but also that it is in good hands, have fun!

beerchug.gif
cjl
Dion
Thanks guys. Appreciate the confidence.
JoeDees
QUOTE(theleschyouknow @ Oct 25 2016, 09:04 PM) *

keep up the good work

somebody I think in the 2016 build off had an alternate method of drilling out the spot welds using regular bits
sorry can't remember who it was or the details like bit sizes but basically it involved drilling just thru the first layer with a larger bit and 'exposing' the weld then drilling a thru hole large enough to remove most if not all of the weld then, if necessary, he reported it was easy to pry/pop the panels apart
kinda sounds like 2 steps to do 1 to me but he seemed to like the results

looks like you have your hands full but also that it is in good hands, have fun!

beerchug.gif
cjl


Doesn't sound exactly like my technique, but I use a cut off (so it only sticks out about 1/4" from the chuck to prevent breaking bits) 1/8" bit to start a pilot hole (aids a big bit's bite), then use something like a 3/8" bit to only go through that top layer before carefully using a seam buster tool to separate. The technique allowed for welding separate panels back together.

Then again, you could be talking about somebody different...
theleschyouknow
QUOTE(DirtyCossack @ Oct 26 2016, 11:57 AM) *

QUOTE(theleschyouknow @ Oct 25 2016, 09:04 PM) *

keep up the good work

somebody I think in the 2016 build off had an alternate method of drilling out the spot welds using regular bits
sorry can't remember who it was or the details like bit sizes but basically it involved drilling just thru the first layer with a larger bit and 'exposing' the weld then drilling a thru hole large enough to remove most if not all of the weld then, if necessary, he reported it was easy to pry/pop the panels apart
kinda sounds like 2 steps to do 1 to me but he seemed to like the results

looks like you have your hands full but also that it is in good hands, have fun!

beerchug.gif
cjl


Doesn't sound exactly like my technique, but I use a cut off (so it only sticks out about 1/4" from the chuck to prevent breaking bits) 1/8" bit to start a pilot hole (aids a big bit's bite), then use something like a 3/8" bit to only go through that top layer before carefully using a seam buster tool to separate. The technique allowed for welding separate panels back together.

Then again, you could be talking about somebody different...


yep that was you nice work!
I got it kinda backward in my explanation
re reading my post it I think it might sound critical but no offense was meant in fact I was impressed with your ingenuity and hoping to pass it on
keep up the good work!


beerchug.gif
cjl
Dion
Fed ex truck dropped off some goods today.
Thanks to the guys at Restoration Design.
These parts are gonna make life a lot easier
in the coming months.
porschetub
QUOTE(Dion @ Oct 26 2016, 01:31 PM) *

Still cutting away. Parts from Restoration Design on the way. Time to break out
the kerosene heater soon. Hitting 38*F tonite.
Drilling out spotwelds is certainly a test of wills. Progress is
slow but it's progress.


Good skills on the bodywork,clever to see you covered the dash....amazing how those little chips of steel go so far and stick/burn to stuff.
Keep up the good work.
tygaboy
QUOTE(Dion @ Oct 28 2016, 02:04 PM) *

Fed ex truck dropped off some goods today.
Thanks to the guys at Restoration Design.
These parts are gonna make life a lot easier
in the coming months.


You're probably OK, but you may want to double check that rear jack point piece to be sure the donut is welded on in the correct orientation. I just got around to fitting mine, only to find out it was put on backwards. It causes the jacking surface of the donut to be "way not parallel" to the ground.
It was a known error but a few parts did get out there.
Dion
Thanks Dean, the whole dash is out. Have a nice NOS to put in there.
I'll be covering more of it with thicker plastic when it's time for paint.
Cutting around the door brace on the jamb side till I can weld a triangular
plate near the floor and long and firewall then I'll remove the jamb.
Goal for tomorrow is removing all of rear left quarter panel. "Tyga" I'll check the donut thanks.
Dion
Ok finally removed rear quarter. It's really amazing what you can find hidden
underneath nice paint. A complete chunk missing beneath the left rear light housing.
Popped right out when I flexed the panel while removing. Next up left inner lower firewall. Oh and my "fresh air" elbow was half bondo!?! So this car had issues
back before 1986. I purchased it March 1986. I never would have known till I took on the task of
putting the six in.
Dion
Panel off
Dion
So this will get fresh paint
tygaboy
QUOTE(Dion @ Nov 5 2016, 06:22 PM) *

So this will get fresh paint


I love pics like the one above! It's like the 6 is patiently waiting, hiding under the bench. Here it's peeking out and saying "Hey car, I see you! We are gonna have some kinda fun!!"

Keep up the great work!
Dion
So with the rear panel off was better able to access the work at hand.
Cleaned up a lot of undercoating.
Found a decent sized hole on the left susp. console.
So I'll be ordering a bit more steel. I want to next remove
the lower inner firewall , to clean up and cut out around and including
the seatbelt anchor.
Dion
Deterioration
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