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cuddy_k
Hi Guys,

I've been working with Mark and Matt at 914 Rubber over the past few weeks to refine the installation process and shoot a video for their a-arm bushing kit. Happy to report that it's finally ready for primetime! Shout outs to Bruce and Cary for all their contributions as well.



And here's a video on how I removed the a-arms and bushings using a press and heat...



Coming soon...
– 914 Rubber master cylinder install
– "Bench" bleeding in the car
– 914 Rubber Rebuilt steering rack with turbo tie rods
– Front wheel bearing replacement

Hope you enjoy my videos. Just trying to give back to this amazing community. Apologies in advance for worsening the addiction.

Have fun with all the innuendo. Can't wait to read the comments wink.gif

Ian
Mikey914
These are a more difficult install. We could have made them smaller and easier to install, but they would have the issues Elephant mentioned. These need to have a very tight tolerance, this is how to do it.
1adam12
Superb video as always!
sithot
QUOTE(1adam12 @ Mar 13 2018, 10:58 AM) *

Superb video as always!



Nicely done. Thanks!

Mueller
Great video, looking forward to watching them all.

Maybe an electric drill to drive those nuts?
914_teener
Great video on the bushing install.

Maybe a part two showing how to set up the bar to the drop links without preloading the bar?
mepstein
Great video. Unfortunately, my 911 A arms are capped at one end. Gotta get a long pipe clamp.

A pair of leather work glows make things easier to handle than the oven mitt.
cuddy_k
QUOTE(mepstein @ Mar 13 2018, 12:48 PM) *

Great video. Unfortunately, my 911 A arms are capped at one end. Gotta get a long pipe clamp.

A pair of leather work glows make things easier to handle than the oven mitt.


My 914 arms were capped too. But it's just a metal disc thats pressure-fit in. I just hammered it back once I was done. I wonder if it's the same on the 911 arms.
mepstein
QUOTE(cuddy_k @ Mar 13 2018, 01:40 PM) *

QUOTE(mepstein @ Mar 13 2018, 12:48 PM) *

Great video. Unfortunately, my 911 A arms are capped at one end. Gotta get a long pipe clamp.

A pair of leather work glows make things easier to handle than the oven mitt.


My 914 arms were capped too. But it's just a metal disc thats pressure-fit in. I just hammered it back once I was done. I wonder if it's the same on the 911 arms.

Probably. Thanks for the tip.
Montreal914
Great video and excellent marketing tool! first.gif

Now, how do I remove the new Uro bushings that are mounted on the refurbished arms that I got from Bruce??? headbang.gif




johnhora
Ian...

Very nice job on the video!
Easy to follow and perfect for the DIY...

mepstein
QUOTE(Montreal914 @ Mar 13 2018, 03:51 PM) *

Great video and excellent marketing tool! first.gif

Now, how do I remove the new Uro bushings that are mounted on the refurbished arms that I got from Bruce??? headbang.gif

Heat works great but since you said refurbished, that complicates things. I would probably remove the end brackets with a press. If the bushing stays in the bracket, use the press to remove. If the bushing is on the arm, mounting the bushing in a vise and twisting the arm will probably work.
Tdskip
Thanks for sharing this
Mikey914
QUOTE(Montreal914 @ Mar 13 2018, 12:51 PM) *

Great video and excellent marketing tool! first.gif

Now, how do I remove the new Uro bushings that are mounted on the refurbished arms that I got from Bruce??? headbang.gif

Heat gun
Montreal914
Press is an option I guess.

Heat gun; Freshly powder coated arms, never re-installed... Glass temperature for power paint is ~80C (Wiki)... sad.gif

An other option would be to install them as is and replace them when they wear out in 1-2 years... dry.gif. Probably the same situation though...
cuddy_k
The companion video to this video...A-arm and bushing removal...is uploading to youtube now. Standby! Personally, I prefer the press. Way faster and less cancer.

I bought a 20 ton press from HF because I couldn't find a shop willing to press the bearings onto the axle of my 65 mustang. In a mustang the main thing keeping the axle on the car is the bearing itself, so I guess no one wanted the liability. Anyway, I thought the press would just become a coat rack, but I'm surprised at how often I use it.
mepstein
It’s a 2 minute job with a torch but only if you are repainting the a arms. Heat the bracket until you see a little smoke and then twist off with a screw driver.
cuddy_k
mepstein is right...it's only 2 minutes with the heat, but it feels much longer wink.gif.

ok, removal video is up...link in the first post.
Mikey914
Powder cures at about 240-280 range (also depends on the powder). You should be able to heat to about 220, but you will have to be careful. This is one of the reasons I like paint. Sand it and re-shoot it.
TargaToy
Ian,

Did you paint your arms or have them powder coated between the removal and installation videos?

They look great!
cuddy_k
Thanks! I blasted and painted the arms. Mark makes a good point that it's way easier to touch up paint than powder coat. And it's likely that stones, etc. will chip whatever is on there. If you do powder coat, make sure you don't use it on the bushing area, as it's tight enough as it is. Powder coat is generally much thicker than paint.

Full disclosure...I used two sets of arms in these videos. If you look closely, you'll see that the ones I took off my car didn't have sway bar brackets. Another member here graciously gave me a set that did, and those are the ones I painted and used for the install video.
mepstein
Powder coat works well for me because we have the setup in the shop and when I bring freshly done parts home, they don’t smell (a big concern with my wife). A good epoxy paint also works well if you prep it right.
BeatNavy
Great video - I could have used this last week when I finished up a total refresh of my A-arms / front suspension smile.gif . I did those with Elephant Racing bushings following the video on their website (with video quality that looks circa 1972 for some reason). Luckily I have another complete front suspension to refresh, and on that one I'll get to try out my 914Rubber bushings.

I had mine powder coated, and they do look awesome. You do have to be careful with masking the seating / bushing surfaces. I was not on the first set, and I had a project on my hands carefully sanding those back to metal once they came back from the shop. I then rattle-canned those surfaces for at least some protection. Whatever you do, also take a look down the inside of the A-Arm. There is likely to be rust inside that needs to be treated.

I ended up using a pipe clamp (like in the Elephant Racing video) that worked well on the front bushing / collar combination. On the rear it would not work. It wouldn't get the bushing on the A-Arm far enough to keep it from slipping right back off. Luckily I have a press, and that made quick work of it.

I was somewhat dreading this after the trailing arm bushing install I did about a year ago, but this process went much smoother.
worn
I have a few suggested twists for this superb filmh popcorn[1].gif

First, if you have a smooth floor, put something down to catch the soap. I am too old to slip and fall indoors. Ice outside happens no matter what.

Second is to use an impact gun on the tool side. It gives a faster, more even pressing, again saving time. You want to wrench at the tool end so you can watch the progress. An alternative that is a bit quicker yet is to make the double nut ahead of time and put that in the vise grips. This only works with the power tool if you have a long enough socket. I started using an impact gun with a gear puller when rebuilding the transmissions for my cars.

Thanks piratenanner.gif beer.gif aktion035.gif
UROpartsman
QUOTE(Montreal914 @ Mar 13 2018, 12:51 PM) *
Now, how do I remove the new Uro bushings that are mounted on the refurbished arms that I got from Bruce??? headbang.gif

Hi Montreal914, sent you a PM.
Mikey914
Might want to check out the elephant racing video as to why they suck

https://youtu.be/X03h2gE4Rao


Yes they actually tested them, who would have thought ? blink.gif

"slipping causes rapid wear"

UROpartsman
QUOTE(Mikey914 @ Mar 14 2018, 04:31 PM) *

Might want to check out the elephant racing video as to why they suck

"slipping causes rapid wear"

Actually we've sold about 10,000 of our control arm bushing kits over the last eleven years with no complaints that anyone can remember. A single marketing video from a direct competitor that is priced almost 6X higher isn't exactly proof of a real-world problem. It would be interesting to see if there's any slippage in actual use, as "rapid wear" hasn't been reported by our shop contacts.

If anyone has a problem with our standard durometer control arm bushings, we'll happily replace them under warranty, or even upgrade them to our performance "Heavy Duty" control arm bushings for folks willing to trade some ride comfort for more responsive handling. The rubber used for our HD control arm bushing kit is 27% more firm than OE to minimize deflection, and being natural rubber these bushings are highly resistant to cold flow deformation.
Mikey914
In honor of our new install video we are running a special at $29 a set and everyday price of $34.94 now!

That and we will beat any competitors price by10%.
Better product better price what more can you ask for!

Oh yeah, a tool to help install!

Right here -

https://shop.914rubber.com/A-Arm-Bushing-Se...m?categoryId=-1

By the way the OE durometer is 92. You can't be 30% more!
UROpartsman
QUOTE(Mikey914 @ Mar 14 2018, 07:05 PM) *
By the way the OE durometer is 92. You can't be 30% more!

huh.gif Sorry but 92 (assuming the shore A scale) is wildly incorrect, and is the equivalent of skateboard or shopping cart wheel rubber. To get an accurate OE durometer figure, you should buy both a NOS genuine control arm and a new genuine control arm (made to the original specs) and remove the bushings to take measurements, as URO did. These control arms are expensive, but it's the only way to get it right.

Just did the math, our HD performance bushings are indeed 27% more resistant to deformation than OE. Facts are facts.
worn
Uhhmm I think this instructional video was a benefit to us all, as it would apply to any situation in which an original or reproduction bushing is needed.
Mikey914
That was the intent.
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