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jerhofer
Forty years ago this past April, I joined PCA with the Michiana (Michigan-Indiana at that time) region in the South Bend area. One of the first people I met was a fellow name George Scott, a true southern gentleman living in the north. Not long afterwards I met his son Ed who was all of twenty years old and still in college. George passed away some years ago but Ed and I have remained friends ever since.

At twenty years of age he had already owned his 1965 356SC for five years!! And still has it!! His father brought him up right! A few years ago Ed began having some problems with his legs. The diagnosis was a neurological disease that has affected his lower body. I had heard about his early issues some years ago but just before Christmas last year, I heard he was in a wheelchair.

So I called him to see how he was doing and discovered that his attitude towards life was still way on the positive side. As usual the conversation turned to cars where I discovered that he had recently sold the turbo-look 911 that he had inherited from his dad. He had also sold a real 914-6 to one of his best friends that he had worked with for many years.

But he had another 914-6, the one I bought from him. As you all know, being a 1974, it was a conversion. The motor began as a 3.0 euro Carrera motor that now is a 3.2 with PMO carbs. The car was built for John Swanson by Perry Kiehl. Perry added the reinforcement panels to the rear wheelwells and to the rockers. He also added the GT flares that were butt welded so well that you cannot feel a seam inside the wheelwell. They began with a car that was rust free.

While John was building the motor at Perry's shop, Perry built a box in the front trunk for the oil cooler. Brad Mayeur built the 901 tranny with a Quaife differential. Since John was moving to Texas, he had the interior done in a light gray so it would be cooler as AC was not in the plans.

All of this happened in 2001-02 ( I have tons of records). John was an avid autocrosser who trailered the car to events with his Cayenne. In 2005 John decided to retire. His wife wanted a more modern Porsche with an automatic so they bought a 996 with Tiptronic and put the 914 up for sale. Which is where my friend Ed came into the picture.

Ed likes to autocross as well as do track events so the car was perfect for him. Unfortunately, at the second track event in 2005, he broke the transmission. Out the motor and tranny came with the tranny sent back to Brad for a rebuild. This time he changed out the intermediate plate from magnesium to aluminum for additional strength and did some other tweaks. The motor and the freshly rebuilt tranny never made it back into the car.

Ed and his wife have lived in their Michigan house for over 30 years. Because it is a tri-level, they purchased a ranch so that Ed could get around better. They want to sell their old house but it was full of their lifelong belongings as well as various cars and car parts. The deal I made with Ed was to buy the car and to take all of his car parts as well, as a way of helping to clean out their garages. Among many other parts, I now have an additional twenty-three wheels w/old tires, a couple of racing seats, an extra transmission, etc.

In mid-May i traveled to Michigan from my North Carolina home to get everything ready so my son and I could come up a couple weeks later with a small moving truck and a car trailer. My good friend Dave drove over from South Bend, Indiana to help at that mid-May gathering. We spent about six hours going through everything and getting the wheels back on the car to get it off the jack stands where it had been setting for thirteen years.

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Ed is an engineer as is my son. While they are about ten years apart in age, they have always had this friendship based on their mutual love of figuring out things. My son was very pleased to see Ed again. Because of Ed's condition, it takes him a while to get going so they gave us the key to the outbuilding and the garage door opener to their garage so we could begin the loading process. We began loading around 3:00 and finished up by 6:00. After a quick shower, we all met for dinner which was spent reminiscing about past PCA event as well as my son talking about some of his experiences with his job at Toyota Racing Development. It was a long, pleasant dinner and the perfect end to the day.


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Now the car is in my garage, the parts have been stowed and I am ready to put it back together.

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The photos below were taken soon after Ed had bought the car, which will give an idea of what it will look like once it is back on the road.


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JRust
Wow sweet ride & a great story. Congrats & sounds like it went to the right person
Larmo63
It looks like a solid build, great story too.

I vote for the Fuchs on the car, they look much better.
Coondog
Enjoy your project. Great looking car.
Maltese Falcon
welcome.png
Enjoy the ride smile.gif
Cairo94507
welcome.png What a terrific story of friendship and the mutual love of our cars. I really like your car. Please post a lot of pictures as you assemble it and get it back on the road. Best wishes- beerchug.gif
GaroldShaffer
I am glad to see that it going back together. I met Ed many years ago at some of the Michiana PCA events and other 914 gatherings. What a great guy. Looking forward to seeing his (your) 914 back on the road where it belongs.
Blue6
Congrats on your new acquisition, and your long friendship. Looks like a pretty special bumper on the rear of that beauty. welcome.png
jerhofer
BTW, Ed says the 2.0 on the rear badge stand for the version rather than the engine size!
914dave
Great looking car. Best of luck.
jerhofer
One of the first things I did was clean up the engine bay. Ed said the engine was blowing some oil so there was a film everywhere. I will need to make sure I have the engine properly vented.


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The engine bay cleaned up nicely.

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jerhofer
Perry built in an oil cooler box in the front trunk and mounted a collapsible spare vertically.

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To make the front trunk more usable, I modified the stock carpeted board that normally lies on top of the stock spare tire. I traced the board on a piece of cardboard and then cut a notch out of that cardboard to allow for the vertical spare. After using that template to modify the original board, I found that the rear of the board was floating in air. To make it solid, I mounted some vertical 2 x 4's for support. I painted the back side and then installed original style carpet on the board.

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jerhofer
Ed was going to run 13" wheels on the car to get lower gearing for autocrossing. To that end, he was in the process of modifying the brake calipers so they would fit inside a 13" wheel. Part of that process was to use time certs where the rear brake calipers mount to the hub. Since I am going to use stock 914 rear calipers (It has 928 front calipers.), those time certs had to come out.

Time certs's website recommended using an "easy out" for removal. When the first one I tried refused to budge, I drilled it out some and tried the "easy out" again. This time a little less than half of it came out. I used a drill and a file to make the remaining time cert thin enough so I could tap the hole. Once I saw that Ed has used a thread locker on the time cert, I applied heat for about a minute to each one which made them easy to remove.


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RickS
Wonderful story about some fantastic people. Glad to see that the car went to a good home and that you have such a great friendship.
914forme
Glad to see another one getting on the road beer.gif
Chip
Cars don't last. Loved ones do.
IronHillRestorations
I spoke with Ed several months ago to ask about the car. Ed's a great guy.

I'm glad to see it's going to an enthusiast!
jerhofer
QUOTE(Perry Kiehl @ Jun 18 2018, 07:40 AM) *

I spoke with Ed several months ago to ask about the car. Ed's a great guy.

I'm glad to see it's going to an enthusiast!


Ed mentioned that you had called about the car. You did a fantastic job on the car. I can't wait to get it back together and on the road. We have a motorhome and have a six week trip scheduled to begin in July so it will be at least late summer before I will have it on the road.

Since I not a big fan of carburetors, I have ordered a fuel injection kit using PMO throttle bodies from Richard Clewett. It is supposed to arrive this week. Figuring out how all that works will also take some time. To offset part of that cost, I will be selling the lightly used PMO carbs.

Among the many wheels that I got from Ed is a set of replica black center Fuchs in 15x7's and 9's. In looking for tires to fit those rims, I am having a difficult time finding anything other than either autocross or track tires. Anyone have any suggestions for a street tire that would fit those rims.? I would like to run 225's front and 245's rear.
IronHillRestorations
Thanks, that was a fun project. Looks like it's held up pretty well, except for the transmission anyway.

That car was a black 2.0 with the Bilstein suspension package, Fuchs, tan interior, and dealer AC. How things have changed. Imagine using a well optioned '74 2.0 for all of this customization!

I encouraged both John Swanson, and Ed Scott (after he bought it) to drive the snot out of it at every opportunity. That's got either GE60 or GE80 cams in it, and would rev up in a heartbeat, and once you hit 4000 RPM's it felt like a 2 cycle motorcycle when you hit the the power band.

I was amazed at Ed's positive outlook when we spoke last winter, a very impressive guy.

Good to see it'll be back on the road soon.
jerhofer
The sail panel trim and the long trim pieces across the back show some wear.

About six years ago I did a body off restoration on a 1964 Corvette. The original windshield trim had some dents in it, so I ordered some replacements. We could never get the repo trim to fit. I mentioned this one day to a Corvette vendor and he said the repo stuff never fits. He asked if I had the original trim. When I said I did, he gave me the name of Dell Metal Polishing in Hubbard, OH. He said this guy would make the original trim look like new. I sent my trim to Dell's and it looked better than new when I got it back.

I called Dell's recently and he said he could work on the 914 trim as well. Today I removed the trim pieces. First the vertical curved pieces have to be removed. There is an 8mm nut inside the wheelwell that must be removed. The right side was fairly easy but, since there is a 911 motor in this car, the dry sump oil tank is in the left side wheelwell, directly below this nut. I finally got a small ratchet wrench on it. With those nuts removed, the only remaining screw is a small phillips. With both sail panels off the car, I could remove the center trim piece. It is held in by three clips. Some gentle persuasion with a plastic pry tool broke it loose.

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jerhofer
There was some surface rust in the battery tray. I don't understand why it was rusty as you can plainly see the outline of the Optima battery. I used a wire brush and some light sanding on the affected areas. I then applied a coat of POR15 to the area where the battery sits. This stuff dries as hard as a rock and is to be used directly over rusty areas to prevent further rust. I plan on using a sealed battery as well and this treatment should prevent future issues.

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With that done, I spent the remainder of the afternoon cleaning the engine. I removed the intake manifolds so I could do a better job of cleaning them separately. Looks better but I still have a ways to go. I need to order the seals for the "holy trinity" of oil leaks at the rear of the motor. Now is the time to make sure it doesn't leak. When I adjust the valves, I will be installing new seals on the valve covers.

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Dion
That’s a beautiful 14! What colour is that?
It looks almost like Marathon blue but not quite.
Nice power plant as well. Having been in 914Daves car
this past weekend, wow that 3.2 has plenty of kick.
Enjoy! Really nice.
jerhofer
QUOTE(Dion @ Jun 18 2018, 05:34 PM) *

That’s a beautiful 14! What colour is that?
It looks almost like Marathon blue but not quite.
Nice power plant as well. Having been in 914Daves car
this past weekend, wow that 3.2 has plenty of kick.
Enjoy! Really nice.


Thanks.

It is not marathon blue, but, as you say, it is close. It is a GM color.
mepstein
Looking forward to the trim restore. It’s a weak point on a lot of our cars. New costs a fortune.
jerhofer
I used my overhead hoist to lift the motor so I could get it on the engine stand. Lots easier to work on it at that height.


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I found an air compressor to inflate the spare tire on eBay.


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During the build back in 2002, Kool-Mat had been installed in the rear trunk. This is good stuff that I also used when I did the restoration of a 1964 Corvette a few years ago. However, it is not meant to be seen. I found a carpet to make the trunk look somewhat better.

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The EFI kit arrived as well. Lots of wiring to do!!!


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Since the EFI parts have arrived, it was time to clean up the PMO cars and get them ready to sell on eBay. I already have a bid.


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jerhofer
To make the 9" wheels work on the rear, I needed to install longer wheel studs. First I had to remove them. I found a stud remover on eBay. It is huge but worked great.
Because it is so heavy duty, I could use my impact wrench.

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I found a tool at O'Reilly's for installing studs. It has a ball bearing that rests against the flange. This allows it to turn when you are tightening down the stud rather than have the nut dig into the flange or a washer. It also worked very well and could be used with the impact wrench.

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With the studs in place, I could install the new 914-6 rotors and the rebuilt 914 calipers. I am missing one hard brake line so I will have to do some digging through the tons of parts that I got with the car to see if it is there.


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jerhofer
I finished up the rear brakes by installing the pads and the hard brake lines.


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Next up was hooking up the parking brake. I attached one side but I could not get the other side to extend far enough to reach rear brake caliper.


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After consulting Ed and the internet, I discovered that removing the boot at the firewall where the brake cable tubes are, there were adjusting nuts. Just behind the parking brake lever inside the car, there is a plate which covers the cables. Each cable attaches to one side of the lever. As you can see in the photo below, the lever was at an angle which meant one parking brake would be applied earlier, and probably with more force, than the other side. By adjusting the cables at the firewall, I was able to hook up both cables and to make the lever straight across inside the car. Once I adjust the brake pads on the calipers, the parking brake should now apply equal pressure to both rear brakes.


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Now I have to try to convince my wife to help me bleed the brakes. Back when we were both doing track events, this was a regular routine prior to each event. It was a pain in the rear for her, but we never had our brakes go soft at the track.
Mueller
Looking great, that motor is going to be fun!
jerhofer
The wife spent a wonderful Sunday morning bleeding brakes...and she did a great job! We have brakes!!


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Now that the brakes were bled, I could adjust the brake pad clearance on the rear brakes. On the outside, I removed the plastic cover, loosened the lock nut and used a 4mm hex wrench to adjust the distance between the brake rotor and the brake pad to .008 or .2mm. With that done, I removed the nut on the rear through the access hole in the trailing arm and did the same adjustment there on the inside pad.


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Dave_Darling
I very strongly recommend that you use 0.004" clearance for the rear brake pads! The 0.008" number results in lousy pedal feel and a handbrake that doesn't hold very well.

I have often wondered if they were thinking of the total clearance (each side of the rotor) when they published the 0.008" figure?

--DD
jerhofer
QUOTE(Dave_Darling @ Jun 25 2018, 08:23 PM) *

I very strongly recommend that you use 0.004" clearance for the rear brake pads! The 0.008" number results in lousy pedal feel and a handbrake that doesn't hold very well.

I have often wondered if they were thinking of the total clearance (each side of the rotor) when they published the 0.008" figure?

--DD


I had a couple of 914's back in the eighties but I did not work on them. So these things I am learning now are all new to me. These parking brakes are quite different from those on the 911's I have owned. I appreciate the heads up. This is one of the reasons I post my projects on cars on enthusiast forums. The feedback is invaluable.

My wife retired from teaching about 20 years ago and took up art. She does oil paintings and has a gallery in Salisbury, NC. About ten years ago I retired. Since then I have bought good cars and did my best to make them better. I enjoy the process and figuring out new things. Which is why I have not done the same car more than once. Below are links to some of the other project cars I have done. I have enjoyed all of them.

Neither my wife and I are content to sit around and do nothing. So, most days my wife goes to her gallery to paint and I go to the garage. Works for us!!

http://forums.pelicanparts.com/porsche-911...67-912-6-a.html

http://forums.pelicanparts.com/porsche-944...-944-turbo.html

https://www.corvetteforum.com/forums/c1-and...y-64-coupe.html

http://www.peachparts.com/shopforum/vintag...0sel-4-5-a.html

And just to show the seed doesn't drop very far from the tree, here is a link to my son's project. His is much more adventurous than mine. We found a roller 1979 911SC into which he is installing a Tesla P85 motor. It will have a RSR body with very wide wheels and tires.

http://www.diyelectriccar.com/forums/showthread.php?t=192602
jerhofer
We are back from our five week motorhome trip and I am ready to get back to working on the car. As I had written previously, I had sent the sail panel trim away to have it refinished. The pieces were here when we returned and they look better than new. I didn't have really good "before" photos but you can get an idea of the improvement with these images. The left side short piece was in the worst condition.

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For those of you who may have some interest, here is a link to his website: https://www.dellmetalpolishing.com/index2.html

He charged me $160 for all three pieces.

Part of the stash of parts that came with the car were five Fuch's 15x6 deep dish heart wheels. I cleaned them up today and am trying to determine the build date. I took this photo of one of the inside spokes but I don't know what to look for to determine the date. I would like to know as I will be selling these.

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mepstein
The date is on the inner ridge between the pedals but not on the pedals on the back of the wheel, near where the center cap sits. A set of 5 in good condition is $4-4,500.

I just sold a single one in fair condition for $750.
pete000
Ha! that's not rust ! Keep posting on the Fi conversion.

jerhofer
QUOTE(mepstein @ Aug 11 2018, 06:30 PM) *

The date is on the inner ridge between the pedals but not on the pedals on the back of the wheel, near where the center cap sits. A set of 5 in good condition is $4-4,500.

I just sold a single one in fair condition for $750.


Thanks for the info. I couldn't go to bed until I looked at the dates. They are all 1-70. The tires appear to be from the eighties. The other wheels are in similar condition to the one pictured here. The finish appears to be original.


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mepstein
I wouldn't let them go for less than $4K and I would start at $4,500 on early911sregistry and pelican.
ClayPerrine
That car is absolutely beautiful. I can remember seeing it at a couple of the MUSR events with the previous owner.

I like the EFI conversion.

jerhofer
I haven't had much time to work on the car since returning from our trip. Too much catching up to do after being gone for five weeks. The wire shelves in our motorhome refrigerator were showing some rust where the finish had failed. I bead blasted those (many, many hours as it is tedious to blast round things) and took them to a powder coater today. My powder coater is very reasonable and new shelves are very expensive. So it should be worth the time spent in the blast cabinet.

To free up some room, I did fine time to place ads for a few items on this forum. I have lots of other parts that came with the car if anybody has a need. I do have an extra 901 tranny. I asked the previous owner about its condition. He got it from a friend of his who had totaled his car many years ago. His recollection is that it was working fine at the time it was removed but he cannot remember how many miles were on it. Pm me if you need something and I will see if I have it.
rgalla9146
What a beautiful car ! Headed back on the road......enjoy the process.
The asymmetrical yoke that pulls the Ebrake cables is mounted upside down.
Turn it over so that 'OBEN' faces up. I think oben is German for UP !
jerhofer
QUOTE(rgalla9146 @ Aug 16 2018, 09:12 PM) *

What a beautiful car ! Headed back on the road......enjoy the process.
The asymmetrical yoke that pulls the Ebrake cables is mounted upside down.
Turn it over so that 'OBEN' faces up. I think oben is German for UP !


Thanks for the info. I will try to remember to do that.
mepstein
Looks like the wheels sold quickly. beerchug.gif
jerhofer
QUOTE(mepstein @ Aug 18 2018, 02:14 PM) *

Looks like the wheels sold quickly. beerchug.gif


A 911 restorer near Dallas bought them.
jerhofer
I finally found a few hours to spend on the engine today. At the rear of a 911 engine is the "Holy Trinity", a place where oil leaks commonly occur. The three items are the oil pressure sender, the oil thermostat, and the breather. Since these would be very difficult to get to once the motor is back in the car, I removed all of them and re-sealed them. Being a little pro-active here.

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Another potential oil leak can come from the engine oil cooler. There are three green seals that I replaced. I spent some time cleaning here as well.

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In anticipation of adjusting the valves, I removed the valve covers on one side before I ran out of time. To get the upper valve cover off, I had to loosen the oil line for the pressure fed chain tensioner. This allowed me to rotate it slightly to make clearance for the valve cover. I taped a note on it to remind me to tighten it once I replace the valve cover.

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jerhofer
Before we left on our motorhome trip, I took the car to my favorite body shop to have a few things addressed. When I initially received the car there was a plastic covering on the leading edge of the rear flares. This plastic covered up a bunch of stone chips. I had both rear quarter panels painted.

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Both the front and rear valances and the rocker panels also needed some help. All of these parts were removed from the car to be painted.

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There was a dent from the bottom side on one of the rear quarter panels. They had been painted only so there was no protection from rocks being thrown up. The body shop applied German schutz underbody seal to the wheel wells. In this photo you can see the the inner fender enforcement kit that Perry Kiehl installed during the build.


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The bumper pads had some cracks so I ordered new ones. The body shop installed them.


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I decided I wasn't happy with the finish on the valve covers. I bead blasted two of them today and will do the other two tomorrow. Then they will make a trip to the powder coater.


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jerhofer
When removing the valve covers, one stud came out with the nut as it was stripped. Had to install a new stud.

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I adjusted the valves. I discovered a pair of brand new turbo lower valve covers which I installed. While waiting for my upper valve covers to be powder coated, I used some cardboard to act as temporary covers.


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Next I removed the old spark plugs. They showed the car had been running rich with the PMO carburetors. I installed the new plugs recommended for the EFI.


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To install the crank fire pulley for the EfI, I first needed to remove the stock pulley. To do that I temporarily installed the flywheel so I could insert a flywheel lock.

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With the stock pulley removed, I was ready to install the crank fire pulley. However, at first, I could not get it to clear the fan housing. The gear on the crank fire pulley needs to be behind the fan housing. To get it into place I had to loosen the fan housing, raise it slightly and then install the crank fire pulley at an angle to clear the fan housing. Once that was done I could line up the pulley on the crankshaft and tighten everything. As you can see in the photo below, there is very little clearance between the fan housing and the pulley.


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Removing the distributor and replacing it with the supplied plug was next on the list. With the plug in place, I could install the crank fire sensor holder.


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mepstein
On a lot of cars, the turbo covers need the outer ribs milled down a bit (I think 3/8' does it, might be 5/8) in order to remove them while the engine is in the car.
jerhofer
QUOTE(mepstein @ Aug 29 2018, 05:02 PM) *

On a lot of cars, the turbo covers need the outer ribs milled down a bit (I think 3/8' does it, might be 5/8) in order to remove them while the engine is in the car.


I can't imagine adjusting the valves with the motor in the car. It's hard enough to do the upper valves in a 911 but, given the small access in a 914, I would need a couple extra double jointed arms, hands and fingers to even consider it. It would be easier to pull the motor.
914Timo
WOW !! Six bolt flywheel. Not an ordinary 3L crank.

Thanks for shearing pics and info. Very very nice car. Love it !!
jerhofer
Had to take the dog to the groomer. I sold my 1999 Boxster and, in North Caroliana, you have to turn in your license plates before you can cancel your insurance. Cancel the insurance first and you will receive a nasty letter from the state. So to the DMV I went. After doing some other running around, I got back to the garage by late morning. Since I had to pick up the dog when she was done at the groomer's, I didn't want to start a big project.

During the night I was thinking about whether or not to paint the fan shroud before I begin to install the throttle bodies. It came to me that I might try some polish and wax to make it look better. That worked!! The first photo was taken earlier while the other photo was taken today after I had applied some elbow grease to the shroud.


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Charlotte has a Cars and Coffee every first Saturday. It is open to anyone who wants to attend and usually attracts at least 500 cars. Every third Sunday, Cars and Cappuccino happens. This is for European cars only and is by invitation. There were a couple McLaren 720S and a couple Ferrari's among the Porsche's and other makes.

One person there had a Euro 911 with Fuchs wheels. Since I was looking for wheels for the 914 I asked him if they were replicas. They were and I would have known that had I looked at the tire size. They were 17" Euromeister's. I had been considering these wheels and I quickly asked him if he was happy with them and did they balance well. The answer was yes to both questions. A little later another gentleman arrived with the same wheel package and was equally positive.

These wheels occasionally go on sale for very special pricing by Automotion. While i was waiting for the sale price, I began to consider what sizes I wanted to order. While the 17's looked great on both of those 911's, I wondered about the thin sidewall of a 17" tire. I finally decided to compromise and go with the 16" wheels, 8's in front and 9's in the rear. They arrived yesterday afternoon and today I mounted the wheels, sans tires, to see if there were any clearance issues. All seemed well so I called Tire Rack and ordered tires.


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For tires I decided on 225/50's front and 245/50's rear. There were about ten options that offered a tire in both sizes. After reading Tire Rack's reviews, I called them to ask about the GENERAL G-MAX RS SL. This is a summer tire. The gentleman at Tire Rack said they had been very impressed with this tire's performance in their testing. General is now owned by Continental which may explain why they did well. A couple years ago I bought a set of General high performance all season tires for my Audi Allroad and was very pleased with them. I ordered the G-Max's and they should arrive at the installer tomorrow.

Gratuitous photos of the cutest and happiest dog in the world. But then I may be biased.


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jerhofer
QUOTE(914Timo @ Aug 30 2018, 12:30 PM) *

WOW !! Six bolt flywheel. Not an ordinary 3L crank.

Thanks for shearing pics and info. Very very nice car. Love it !!


The car came with this Kennedy Engineering flywheel & clutch.
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