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> Urgent question - stripped oil pickup bolt
AndrewBlyholder
post Jul 31 2020, 04:55 PM
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Dropped the motor on my street car for hell hole rust repairs. As long as I had the motor out, thought I'd fix a few oil leaks, which I thought were mostly old push rod tube seals having given out. Just discovered the bolt that holds the oil pickup tube is stripped. That will definitely be a leaker too. The real fix for this is to of course split the case and heli-coil the stripped threads. Really didn't want to go there. Does anyone have any suggestions for a fix for this that DOESN'T include splitting the case?

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Andrew B.
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914sgofast2
post Jul 31 2020, 09:23 PM
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QUOTE(AndrewBlyholder @ Jul 31 2020, 03:55 PM) *

Dropped the motor on my street car for hell hole rust repairs. As long as I had the motor out, thought I'd fix a few oil leaks, which I thought were mostly old push rod tube seals having given out. Just discovered the bolt that holds the oil pickup tube is stripped. That will definitely be a leaker too. The real fix for this is to of course split the case and heli-coil the stripped threads. Really didn't want to go there. Does anyone have any suggestions for a fix for this that DOESN'T include splitting the case?

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Andrew B.

Sounds like you have the dreaded “Type 4 Syndrome.” It’s likely that the middle cam bearing boss is cracking. The case needs to be welded to fix it, and possibly line bored. I had the same thing happen. It’s cheaper just to source another engine and use it as is or rebuild it to your liking and install it. Your current engine is probably just parts now.
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914Sixer
post Aug 1 2020, 09:26 AM
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1st up try putting a new bolt in. 2nd shot is new bolt with split washer.
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Krieger
post Aug 1 2020, 10:00 AM
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Just to be clear. Is this threads on the stud that holds the sump plate cover on? I would consider using red locktite, but you may not be able to get enough torque on it. What about using the next size down metric or standard die and make some new threads?
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Jake Raby
post Aug 1 2020, 06:25 PM
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Unless it has "syndrome" you can use a longer bolt to cheat a little bit, and get some new threads. The issue with this is, pieces of the old threads that are damaged can end up in the oil sump.

If it has syndrome, tear it down.
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AndrewBlyholder
post Aug 9 2020, 04:07 PM
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Thanks for the suggestions.

Tried a longer bolt but it wasn't feeling like it was going to hold any torque. Decided to bite the bullet and do a full disassembly. Heli-colied the stripped threads and it's in the process of going back together. In hindsight, the disassembly and reassembly process isn't what takes time, it's all the parts cleaning!! If it had a been a clean motor to start with, then it might not have been so bad, but this was my street car motor, which had been leaking oil for many years. Last time I had it out of the car for clean up and oil leak repairs was 20 years ago. Not wanting to reassemble rusty parts, I've also been sand blasting and repaint the engine tin, intake manifold tubes, and all the various sensors and brackets. That has also been a time consuming process. So a word to the wise: rebuilding a functioning motor is pretty quick and easy, rebuilding a nice looking motor takes a LOT more time! (IMG:style_emoticons/default/laugh.gif)

Andrew
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Tonyooc
post Aug 9 2020, 04:47 PM
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You can try a heli coil.
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